I understand
arrow drop search cross
Phyllida Barlow, RIG: untitled; stagechairs, 2011. Accepted by HM Government in 2021 under the Cultural Gifts Scheme and allocated jointly to The Hepworth Wakefield and Leeds Art Gallery. The Contemporary Art Society encouraged the use of the Cultural Gifts Scheme to make the gift. Photo: George Baggaley
What's on >

A Living Collection

11 March 2022 - January 2023

Exhibition entry is £12 / £10 / FREE for Members, Wakefield District residents and under 18s. Ticket includes entry to all our gallery spaces on the day of visit.

Book Now

Since Wakefield’s art collection was established in 1923, it has had an aim of nurturing an understanding of contemporary art and its relation to modern life. The Hepworth Wakefield continues to develop the collection with this core aim, showing how art can help us understand and explore current lived experiences. This exhibition will showcase a number of important acquisitions made over the last two years, which will be displayed at the gallery for the very first time.

Alvaro Barrington considers himself primarily a painter, but employs a multimedia approach to image-making, using a vast range of materials from postcards to clothing. The large-scale painting (2m x 2m), incorporates carpet and wood on burlap paper, with a custom-made concrete frame. It is from a series of work comprising multi-layered square canvases made from textiles, in which he combines traditional craft techniques with references to modernism and street culture. In Em reclining sofa bed w/ Burberry pillow, 2021 Barrington reinterprets the traditional representation of the reclining female figure. The subject is painted a vivid blue and adorned with a single gold hoop earring. The sofa bed and Burberry pillow signify modern domestic interiors, the intimacy of their setting emphasised through Barrington’s use of warm colour, the yarn’s softness, and the subject’s relaxed pose.

Alvaro Barrington, Em reclining sofa bed w/ Burberry pillow, 2021. Photo: Charles Duprat. Acquired for The Hepworth Wakefield in 2021 through a generous donation from The Roden Family and with thanks to Thaddaeus Ropac gallery.

Phyllida Barlows monumental sculptural installation RIG: untitled; stagechairs, 2011 reaches 3.5m high and 4m wide. The work explores the idea of sculpture as stage and invites the viewer to explore the relationship between object and architectural space. ‘There’s something about walking around sculpture that has the possibility of being reflective, like walking through a landscape,’ Barlow has said. ‘The largeness of sculpture has that infinite possibility to make one engage beyond just the object itself and into other realms of experience.’

Phyllida Barlow, RIG: untitled; stagechairs, 2011. Accepted by HM Government in 2021 under the Cultural Gifts Scheme and allocated jointly to The Hepworth Wakefield and Leeds Art Gallery. The Contemporary Art Society encouraged the use of the Cultural Gifts Scheme to make the gift. Photo: George Baggaley

Stefanie Heinze (b. 1987, Berlin) lives and works in Berlin. Heinze has gained recognition for her brightly coloured and imaginative compositions, which draw on the legacies of Surrealism. From disembodied body parts and everyday objects, to animal-like figures, her subjects melt into colourful, fantastical backgrounds to create vivid visual worlds. Parasol (STICK THER F BOI) was made in 2021 during lockdown in Germany. Heinze drew on her experience of restricted movement and limited social interaction, using the surface of the canvas as a space for the imagination – a substitute for closeness and touch.

Stefanie Heinze, Parasol (STICK THER F BOI), 2021 Acquired for The Hepworth Wakefield in 2021 through a generous donation from Elie Khouri Art Foundation and with thanks to Pippy Houldsworth Gallery.

The Hepworth Wakefield curated Dana Schutz’s first solo exhibition in the UK in 2014, so is delighted to have been given the opportunity to add a bronze work by this renowned American artist to the collection. Atlas, 2019 is part of a series that marks the artist’s move into sculpture. The surfaces of Schutz’s recent paintings are thickly impastoed, almost sculptures created in paint. The figurative sculptures transform elements of the paintings into 3D objects that are first moulded in clay and then cast in bronze.

Dana Schutz, Atlas, 2019 bronze © Dana Schutz. Courtesy the artist, David Zwirner and Thomas Dane Gallery. Photo: Ben Westoby. Acquired for The Hepworth Wakefield in 2021 through a generous donation from The Peter Dubens Foundation and with thanks to Thomas Dane Gallery

Halima Casell (b. 1975) was born in Kashmir, Pakistan, grew up in Lancashire and now lives in Shropshire. Fusing her Asian roots with a fascination for African pattern work and her deep passion for architectural geometry, Halima’s work is intense yet playful, structured yet creative; substantial yet dynamic and invariably compelling in its originality.

Halima Cassell, Fan, 2005. Unglazed clay. Presented by Jerwood Foundation with Art Fund. Photo: David Lindsay

Cecily Brown is a London-born artist based in New York City. Her work is characterised by her gestural and dynamic handling of paint. She often uses direct references to Old Master painting and classical imagery. Armorial Memento is from a group of works commissioned by Blenheim Palace as part of their contemporary artist exhibition programme. Brown has previously described the collection of paintings as ‘dynamic and dramatic, almost cartoonish, especially with their bright colours’.

Cecily Brown, Armorial Memento, 2019 (Oil on UV – curable pigment on linen). Acquired with generous support from Wendy Fisher and The Kirsh Foundation, facilitated by Thomas Dane Gallery, 2022

In 2020, the Contemporary Art Society awarded The Hepworth Wakefield its Great Works grant, which supports UK museums to acquire a major work by a British contemporary artist who has established an international reputation. Following her nomination for the Hepworth Prize for Sculpture in 2018, The Hepworth Wakefield sought to acquire a work by Mona Hatoum, one of Britain’s most celebrated artists. Hatoum’s work examines ideas of displacement and otherness through a language of sculpture that draws on the forms and symbolism of everyday objects. For The Hepworth Wakefield, Hatoum has created a new work Electrified (variable III), 2021 in an important series wherein domestic objects are suspended in a floor-to-ceiling column and charged with an electric current. The work monumentalises and makes threatening humble everyday objects to provoke a questioning of notions of home.

RELATED