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The Hepworth Research Network currently includes members from across the fields of art history, fine art, curation, conservation and music. For future events we hope to expand the reach of the network and always welcome new members. If you are interested in joining, please contact Eleanor Clayton eleanorclayton@hepworthwakefield.org.

Network Members

Professor Monty Adkins

Monty Adkins is a composer and performer of experimental electronic music. His work has been commissioned by BBC Radio 3, IRCAM, INA-GRM He has released albums of his work on numerous labels including Audiobulb, Cronica, Eilean and emprientes DIGITALes, recognised at the Qwartz Awards (Paris) and Prix Opus awards (Canada). He has collaborated extensively with painters and photographers creating immersive audio visual installations. Additionally, he is the author of numerous chapters and articles on the aesthetics of digital music and sonic art. He is currently Professor of Experimental Electronic Music and Dean of the Graduate School at the University of Huddersfield.

Jo Baring

Jo Baring is the Director of the Ingram Collection, which is a not-for-profit organisation founded by philanthropist and serial entrepreneur Chris Ingram. The Ingram Collection contains over 700 works of art, of which the majority have been lent for public display. Jo leads the strategy on public engagement with the art collection, working extensively with museums and galleries, and runs the charity’s ‘Ingram Prize’ which supports emerging artists through mentoring, events and an exhibition. She was previously a Director of Christie’s UK, specialising in 20th century British Art. Jo is a trustee of the Artists Collecting Society and ArtCan.

Professor David Bate 

David Bate is Professor of Photography at the University of Westminster, London UK. His research interests are in avant-garde photography, art and culture. His publications include Photography and Surrealism: Sexuality, Colonialism and Social Dissent (IB Tauris, 2004),   Art Photography  (Tate Publications, 2015),  Photography: Key Concepts  (Routledge, 2019) and  Photography as Critical Practice  (Intellect, 2020). His work is widely known as interdisciplinary, drawing on history, theory and different practices. He was  co-founder of the artist space Five Years, and  co-founder and currently co-editor of the journal  Photographies. His own photowork practice has been widely  exhibited across the UK and internationally.

 

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 3 'Form and Absence': Monty Adkins

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 2 'Upcoming Projects': Jo Baring

Dr Helena Bonett

Helena Bonett is a curator, writer and lecturer who completed her AHRC-funded collaborative doctorate at the Royal College of Art and Tate on the legacy of Barbara Hepworth. Helena was an Associate of the Tate St Ives’ Artists Programme in 2014-15, for which she directed a film about the Barbara Hepworth Museum, and in 2013 convened a Tate Research seminar focusing on the preserved studios at the Hepworth Museum as part of the Hepworth Studios Conservation Project. She is currently working on a research project at Dorich House Museum, Kingston University and tutors MA students in Critical and Historical Studies at the Royal College of Art, London.

 

Brass Art

Brass Art is the collaborative practice of Chara Lewis, Kristin Mojsiewicz and Anneké Pettican. Working together since 1999 they have explored notions of time, doubling, embodiment, the shadow and liminality working with both traditional media and digital technologies including 3D bodyscanning and 3D rapid prototyping. Their current research focuses on the creative and performative potential of 4D scanning using Kinect on-range sensors and includes the expertise of practitioners Spencer Roberts, Monty Adkins and Alistair MacDonald in programming and acoustics. Recent exhibitions include: Sensorium, SUSAS Shanghai (2019), that-which-is-not Bury Sculpture Centre, Manchester (2018), GESTURED Chetham’s Library, Manchester (2017), and Brass Art: Freud’s House The International3, Salford (2015). Chara Lewis is Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at Manchester School of Art, Manchester Metropolitan University. Kristin Mojsiewicz is Lecturer in Art at Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh. Anneke Pettican is Acting Head of Department in Art and Communication, School of Art, Design and Architecture, University of Huddersfield.

 

Deborah Cane

Deborah Cane is the Conservation Manager for Sculpture and Installation Art at Tate. She originally trained as an objects conservator and updated her training in 2010 with an MA in preventive conservation. She has worked at National Museums Scotland, National Museums Liverpool and Birmingham Museums Trust. At Tate, Deborah oversees the programme of works for the team, across the four museum sites and two off store facilities. She also manages the twice yearly maintenance and supports individual projects and treatments at the Barbara Hepworth Museum and Sculpture Garden.

 

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 5 'Beyond Sculpture' discussion chaired by Helena Bonett

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Anneké Pettican 'A Note on the Role of the Artist'

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 5 'Beyond Sculpture': Deborah Cane

Eleanor Clayton

Eleanor Clayton is Curator at The Hepworth Wakefield and a Barbara Hepworth specialist. As Assistant Curator at Tate Liverpool (2010–14) she curated displays around Hepworth’s work, alongside exhibitions of international modern art such as Mondrian and his Studios: Colour in Space and Nasreen Mohamedi. At The Hepworth Wakefield she has curated exhibitions such as Hepworth in Yorkshire and A Greater Freedom: Hepworth 1965-75, while bringing Hepworth’s work in dialogue with contemporary artists. Clayton has published widely on British Modern art. In addition to journal papers and reviews, she is editor and co-author of Lee Miller and Surrealism in Britain and Alan Davie & David Hockney: Early Works. Her forthcoming book Barbara Hepworth: Art & Life will be published by Thames & Hudson in May 2021.

 

Dr Alice Correia

Alice Correia is an independent art historian. She is a specialist in late twentieth-century British art and her current research project is titled Articulating British Asian Art Histories, which examines the work of South Asian diaspora artists active in Britain since the 1950s. Between 2012 and 2014 she was the Henry Moore Foundation Research Fellow at Tate, where she catalogued Tate’s collection of Henry Moore’s sculptures. She has presented her research on Moore at Leeds Art Gallery, The Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, and The Hepworth Wakefield. Between 1999-2012 she worked at Gimpel Fils, London, and her research on Barbara Hepworth’s relationship with the gallery during the 1950s and ‘60s has been published  Tate Papers  and  Sculpture Journal.  She is  co-chair of the British Art Network’s Black British Art research group and is currently working as a  Research Curator at Touchstones Rochdale on a major project examining the gallery’s exhibition programme during the 1980s.

 

Dr Penelope Curtis

Penelope Curtis is Director of the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum. She studied Modern History at Corpus Christi College, Oxford followed by a Masters and PhD on French sculpture after Rodin at the Courtauld Institute of Art. She was the first Exhibitions Curator at Tate Liverpool when it opened in 1988 and was closely involved with Tate’s British collections. In 1994 she joined Leeds Museums & Galleries as Head of the Henry Moore Centre for the study of sculpture, leading its transformation into the Henry Moore Institute and becoming Curator in 1999. Major exhibitions she has curated or co-curated include Barbara Hepworth: A Retrospective at Tate Liverpool in 1994 and Modern British Sculpture at the Royal Academy in 2011. She was also chair of the jury for the Turner Prize. Curtis is an established scholar and author with particular interest in inter-war art and architecture and contemporary art. Her publications include Sculpture 19001945 in the Oxford History of Art (Oxford 1999) and Patio & Pavilion: the place of sculpture in modern architecture (Ridinghouse/Getty 2007).

 

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 4 'Colour' discussion chaired by Eleanor Clayton

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Response by Penelope Curtis

Laura Davies

Laura Davies is a freelance sculpture conservator for clients including The Hepworth Wakefield, Tate Liverpool, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Arts Council Collection, Leeds City Art Gallery and Henry Moore Institute. Recent projects have included the restoration of Hepworth’s Dual Form (1965) for Guildhall St Ives and two casts of The Family of Man (1970) at Wakefield and Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Laura was Senior Sculpture Conservator for Tate Britain for ten years. Prior to this she worked for the National Museums Science and Industry to prepare 2,000 objects for installation in the new ‘Welcome Gallery’; these included ethnographic, archaeological, scientific and Industrial materials. Laura studied for a Masters Degree in Conservation at The Royal College of Art / Victoria and Albert Museum. Her first degree was in Fine Art / Sculpture at Staffordshire University and she was raised by two potters in the heart of Mid-Wales. Today she continues to work on her own ceramic and sculptural practice in her studio in Todmorden, West Yorkshire, where she lives with her partner and two children.

 

Stephen Feeke

Stephen Feeke is a curator and writer. He worked at the Henry Moore Institute, Leeds before becoming a Director of the New Art Centre, Roche Court, where he organised several exhibitions exploring different aspects of Barbara Hepworth’s work. He is currently researching a PhD on Hepworth’s early bronzes.

 

Dr Hannah Higham

Hannah Higham is Curator of Henry Moore Collections and Exhibitions at the Henry Moore Foundation. She has previously worked in Norwich, Birmingham and London and has published widely on the subject of sculpture. Her academic interests encompass not only modern and contemporary sculpture but also that of sixteenth century Florence.

 

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Keynote Lecture: Laura Davies: 'Revealing Hepworth's True Colours'

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 5 'Beyond Sculpture': Stephen Feeke

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 1 'Materials': Hannah Higham

Tessa Jackson ACR

Tessa Jackson has 31 years’ experience as a conservator, with over 26 years specialising in the conservation and restoration of modern and contemporary sculpture. She worked at Tate between 1994-2017 in various capacities, whilst simultaneously establishing her own conservation and consulting business. Tessa enjoys working with diverse materials and working closely with artists and their foundation and estates.  She has contributed to publications including the 2019 Getty publication Concrete – Case Studies in Conservation Practice (Conserving Modern Heritage), Barbara Hepworth, The Plasters: The Gift to Wakefield (Lund Humphries, 2011), and the 1999 Tate publication Material Matters: The Conservation of Modern Sculpture. Tessa has a studio specialising in modern and contemporary conservation which provides museum quality conservation services to private collectors, auction houses, insurers, commercial galleries and public institutions worldwide.

Professor Megan R. Luke

Megan R. Luke is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Southern California and author of Kurt Schwitters: Space, Image, Exile (Chicago, 2014). She is the editor of Myself and My Aims: Writings on Art and Criticism, the first English edition of Schwitters’s theoretical texts (Chicago, 2021) and co-editor of the volume, Photography and Sculpture: The Art Object in Reproduction (Getty, 2017). With the support of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, she is currently completing a new book, The Sculptural Surrogate: Reproduction and the Object of the Past.

Dr Jenna Lundin Aral

Jenna Lundin Aral has been assisting Sophie Bowness in the preparation of the paintings and drawings catalogue raisonné since 2017. She received her PhD from the Courtauld Institute in 2018.

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 3 'Form and Absence': Tessa Jackson

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 5 'Beyond Sculpture': Jenna Lundin Aral

Sara Matson

Sara Matson is an exhibitions and displays curator at Tate St Ives, leading on the Naum Gabo exhibition with Natalia Sidlina and Anne Barlow which opened at Tate St Ives in January 2020. As lead curator for the displays, she is also responsible for the Barbara Hepworth Museum and, since 2015, the Palais de Danse Studio. She has recently co-curated Barbara Hepworth at Musée Rodin with Director, Catherine Chevillot and is currently overseeing the conservation management planning for Hepworth’s second studio, the Palais de Danse.  She is currently working on the new collection display Modern Conversations, co curated with Sally Noall and produced with Rachel Smith, Giles Jackson and Helen Bent, which will open at Tate St Ives in March 2021.

Lyndsey Morgan

Lyndsey Morgan has over 30 years of experience as a conservator and has specialised in sculpture since 1992 when she worked at Tate for 11 years before starting her own company. She now regularly works on conservation and restoration projects for an international range of clients in both the private and public sector. She has published and presented on diverse subjects from the 3D documentation of sculptures by Naum Gabo to treatments on New Generation sculptures and the challenges of working on an Ed Ruscha screen.  Her particular interest in the artificial patination of bronzes began early in her Tate career when she started visiting foundries to learn about the process and subsequently undertook an Mphil on this subject with the RCA/V&A programme. She has worked with a number of sculptures by Barbara Hepworth throughout her career and continues to learn through this experience.

Charlotte Moth

Charlotte Moth was born in 1978 in Carshalton (UK). She has lived in Paris since 2008. In 2017, she was one of four nominees for the Duchamp Prize, presented at the Centre Pompidou, Paris. Her major solo shows to date include: enjambment, Marcelle Alix, Paris (2020), Colección XVI, Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Madrid (2019), Seeing while moving, MIT–List Visual Arts Center, Boston (2017); Travelogue, Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein (2016); Tate Britain Archive Room, London; Esker Foundation, Calgary (2015); Centre d’art contemporain, Geneva (2012); Serralves Foundation, Porto (2011). Currently Charlotte has an exhibition at art3, Valence, France with the artist Mo Laudi, and forthcoming group exhibitions include Light and Language, Lismore Castle, Ireland curated by Lisa Le Feuvre.

 

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 2 'Upcoming Projects': Sara Matson

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 4 'Colour': Lyndsey Morgan

Dr Clare Nadal

Clare Nadal completed her PhD at the University of Huddersfield/The Hepworth Wakefield and was Assistant Curator at The Hepworth Wakefield. Her research focused on the personal library of Barbara Hepworth, examining the significance that reading held for the development of Hepworth’s art. In 2017 she curated the first display of Hepworth’s library at The Hepworth Wakefield as part of the exhibition Masterpieces by Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore, and convened an associated public programme. Recent publications include the essay ‘Sculpture and Reading: The Personal Library of Barbara Hepworth’ for Barbara Hepworth (Musée Rodin, Paris, 2019). She is currently working as Research Co-ordinator at the Henry Moore Institute, Leeds.

 

Derek Pullen

Derek Pullen was Head of Sculpture Conservation at Tate responsible for the care and conservation of all Barbara Hepworth’s sculptures in the national collection including those on loan from the Hepworth Estate in St Ives.  He is now Co-Director of SculpCons Ltd, a sculpture conservation consultancy specialising in modern and contemporary works.

 

Anne-Katrin Purkiss

Anne- Katrin Purkiss has a degree in Photography and Journalism from Leipzig University, Germany (1983) and worked in the picture department of Associated Press, London (1984 – 88). She has been a freelance photographer since 1989, working mainly for government and cultural organisations. Recent commissions include the ART UK National Sculpture Documenting Project, the Royal Academy of Arts and the Royal Society of Sculptors. Her publications include, Sculptors at Work (2021, ISBN 978-1-908455-26-0), Sculptors 1986-2016 (2017, ISBN 978-0-9934111-2-0), Sculpture Shock – Site-Specific Interventions (2016, ISBN 978-1-91116418-0) and Skulptur (2015, ISBN 978-3-7757-4043-2). Her work can be found in archives and public collections, such as the Henry Moore Institute, National Portrait Gallery, Royal Academy of Arts and Tate.

 

 

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 5 'Beyond Sculpture': Clare Nadal

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 1 'Materials': Derek Pullen

Rosanne Robertson

Rosanne Robertson (b. Sunderland 1984) is a contemporary artist currently based in West Cornwall. Their practice spans across sculpture, photography, drawing and performance to explore the boundaries of the human body and its environment. Robertson’s body of work titled Stone (Butch) was exhibited as a contemporary intervention within the display of work by Barbara Hepworth at The Hepworth Wakefield and in the group exhibition Associated Matter at Yorkshire Sculpture Park as part of Yorkshire Sculpture International 2019. Their public sculpture We Built Ships (2021) has been commissioned by Sunderland Council as a legacy to the 700 women who worked in Sunderland’s shipyards. Their work has been included in reviews and articles in Elephant, Wallpaper, The Financial Times and Art Monthly. Robertson’s work and writing are included in Breaking the Mould publication (Hayward Publishing) by Arts Council Collection. During 2020 Robertson has been a selected studio holder at Porthmeor Studios, St Ives, continuing sculptural works that explore the terrain of the Queer body in the seascape, its caves, openings and overspills. Bodies of works in equal parts sculpture, drawing and video capture moments, schisms and shifts, often exploring negative space and expanded representations of the figure. Robertson’s works Between Two Bodies, Packing and The Island have been purchased by the Contemporary Art Society for The Hepworth Wakefield collection.

 

Melanie Rolfe

Melanie Rolfe is a sculpture conservator at Tate. She began there as a Gabo Trust intern 25 years ago and has seen the collection grow from around 1500 sculptural works to the current total of around 3300 sculptures and complex installations. For most of that time she has worked as an acquisitions conservator, assessing and processing new works coming into Tate’s Collection. She has been part of the team maintaining sculptures at the Barbara Hepworth Museum for many years and was Project Conservator for the Hepworth Studios Conservation project 2013-14.

 

Natalie Rudd

Natalie Rudd is a curator and writer. As Senior Curator of the Arts Council Collection, she has curated many touring exhibitions using collections of modern and contemporary British art as her starting point. She has also held previous curatorial positions at Tate Liverpool and the University of Manchester. Her published work includes: Peter Blake (Tate Publishing, 2003), Kaleidoscope: Colour & Sequence in 1960s British Art (Hayward Publishing, 2017), Tess Jaray (Ridinghouse / Sotheby’s, 2017) and Paul de Monchaux: A Monograph (Ridinghouse, 2018). Recent texts: Breaking the Mould: Sculpture by Women since 1945 (Hayward Publishing, 2020, essay), Peter Blake: Collage (Thames & Hudson, interview), Veronica Ryan (Spike Island, Bristol, 2021, essay) and The Self-Portrait (2021, Thames & Hudson, book).

 

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 3 'Form and Absence': Rosanne Robertson

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 4 'Colour': Melanie Rolfe

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 2 'Upcoming Projects': Natalie Rudd

Dr Rachel Rose Smith

Rachel Rose Smith is a freelance researcher and curator. Her doctoral thesis considered legacies of Cubism and Constructivism in London and St Ives in the ’30s and ’40s. Her work on Hepworth has focused on the early ’30s, wartime, phenomenology, connections with Rilke and the late 1960s. She was the founding curator at the Heong Gallery at Downing College, Cambridge and then Assistant Curator at Tate Britain. She is now co-editing the catalogue raisonné of Ben Nicholson’s paintings and reliefs.

 

Dr Chris Stephens

Chris Stephens is the Director of The Holburne Museum, Bath. Previously he was the Head of Displays and Lead Curator of Modern British Art at Tate Britain. He is one of the foremost scholars of 20th century British art and the art of St Ives. He received MAs in History of Art from the University of Edinburgh, and in British Art and Critical Theory from the University of Sussex; here his doctorate was in ‘St Ives Artists and Landscape 1939-64’. Major exhibitions he has curated for Tate Britain include David Hockney (2017), Barbara Hepworth: Sculpture for a Modern World (2015), Picasso and Modern British Art (2012), Henry Moore (2010), and Francis Bacon (2008). He has curated a number of exhibitions at Tate St Ives, including Barbara Hepworth: Centenary (2003) and his book St Ives: The Art and the Artists was published in 2018.

 

Alice Strang

Alice Strang is Senior Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the National Galleries of Scotland (NGS). She read History of Art at Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge before joining Christie’s in London, where she worked as a Specialist in the Impressionist and Modern, Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Art departments. A highlight of her time there was travelling by sleeper train from Paddington to Penzance in order to complete an insurance valuation of the Hepworth Estate in St Ives. One of her first tasks on arrival at the NGS in 1999 was the announcement of the acquisition of Hepworth’s carved, painted and stringed sculpture Wave (1943-44). She walks past Hepworth’s Conversation with Magic Stones (1973), installed in the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art grounds, every day on her way to her desk. Strang was made a Saltire Society Outstanding Woman of Scotland for her leadership of the 2015 Modern Scottish Women: Painters and Sculptors 1885-1965 project.  .

 

 

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 1 'Materials': Chris Stephens

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Panel 4 'Colour': Alice Strang

Professor Michael White

Michael White is a Professor in History of Art working chiefly on the interwar avant-gardes. He wrote his doctoral thesis on Theo van Doesburg and has a special interest in De Stijl and modernism in the Netherlands. He was consultant curator of the 2010 Tate Modern exhibition Van Doesburg and the International Avant-Garde: Constructing a New World, advised the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag on the display of its permanent Mondrian and De Stijl collections, and was the external curator of the exhibition Mondrian and his Studios at Tate Liverpool in 2014. Michael is also the author of Generation Dada: The Berlin Avant-Garde and the First World War (Yale University Press, 2013) and the co-editor of Virgin Microbe: Essays on Dada (Northwestern University Press, 2013). The dual interests he has in abstraction and Dada are informing his latest research projects.

Hepworth Research Network Launch: Michael White 'Introduction to the Hepworth Research Network'